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YourBittorrent - P2P/Download News



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Copyright groups regularly criticize Cloudflare for shielding the hosting locations of pirate sites but in a rebuttal the company paints a different picture. Organizations such as the RIAA and MPA are part of Cloudflare's "trusted notifier" program through which they can get information about accused sites within hours, including IP addresses. However, not all rightsholders treat this privacy-sensitive information with care.

Earlier this month, several copyright holder groups sent their annual “Notorious Markets” recommendations to the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

The submissions are meant to call out well-known piracy sites, apps, and services, but Cloudflare was frequently mentioned as well.

Cloudflare in the ‘Piracy’ Spotlight

The American web security and infrastructure provider can’t be officially listed in the final report since it’s not a foreign company. However, rightsholders have seized the opportunity to point out that the CDN service helps pirate sites with the...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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After filing a lawsuit in the summer against the operator of IPTV services including Area 51 and Altered Carbon, last month several Hollywood studios, Netflix and Amazon, demanded $16.35m in damages. In a judgment handed down this week, the movie and TV show companies were awarded 'just' $272,500 and recovered just a fraction of their claimed legal costs.

As part of their ongoing efforts to shut down or disrupt pirate IPTV services, Universal, Amazon, Columbia, Disney, Netflix, Paramount, Sony, and other content creators sued Jason Tusa, the operator of the Area 51, Digital UniCorn Media, Singularity Media, and Altered Carbon services.

Tusa had been on the radar of the studios for some time and had previously shut down Area 51 after reaching a settlement agreement with anti-piracy coalition Alliance For Creativity and Entertainment. Tusa failed to honor that agreement by continuing in the pirate IPTV business, the lawsuit ensued, and ...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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The Motion Picture Association would like the US Government's executive cybersecurity order to be optimized to identify operators of pirate sites and services. Among other things, the order should require U.S.-based IaaS providers, including hosting services, DNS servers, reverse proxies, and cryptocurrency exchanges, to robustly verify the identities of foreign customers.

Anonymity is a great good on the Internet but increasingly there are calls for stricter identity checks.

Such requirements are not new. In daily life, many people encounter situations where they have to prove their identity. When opening a bank account, for example. But online it is still rare.

At the start of this year, then-President Donald Trump signed an executive order that could help change this. Titled: ‘Taking Additional Steps to Address the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities,’ aims to tackle online cybercrime ...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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"Free Download Manager" is an iconic download tool that's been around for nearly two decades. In 2007, the software was one of the first applications to support YouTube downloads but that's come to an end, for now. Following a complaint from YouTube parent Google, the functionality was suddenly removed a few days ago.

With over a billion users YouTube is the largest video portal on the Internet.

The service opens the door to a wealth of information and entertainment, including the latest and greatest music which can be streamed for free.

Through YouTube, the music industry generated billions of dollars in advertising revenue. While this sounds great, YouTube also presents an indirect threat, as third-party tools allow people to rip and download music to enjoy outside of the streaming service.

Stream-ripping Crackdown

Over the past several years, major music labels have taken legal...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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Columbia Pictures, Disney, Paramount, Universal, Warner and Netflix have obtained a new injunction from the High Court in London. It requires six major ISPs to block access to five pirate streaming portals with tens of millions of visitors. They appear to have been on the radar of the Motion Picture Association for some time.

Six major ISPs – BT, EE, Plusnet, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media – control more than 90% of the fixed line broadband market in the UK. This means that when copyright holders want to prevent access to pirate sites in the region, these providers are regularly named in blocking injunction applications.

Late Friday, the High Court reported that Columbia Pictures, Disney Enterprises, Netflix Studios, Paramount Pictures, Universal City Studios and Warner Bros. Entertainment made submissions in a new application earlier this month, requesting an order for the ISPs listed above t...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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A series of takedown notices, sent under the guise of the FBI and other mysterious anti-piracy forces, aims to wipe APK sites from Google's search results. Most bizarrely, perhaps, are threats warning of hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines and even prison time for the accused site operators. Add in an unverified extortion threat, and things start to look quite grim.

Over the years we have seen our fair share of bizarre DMCA takedown notices, but we continue to be surprised by new schemes.

This week we can add another to the list, one that has some serious threats attached.

The notices in question were sent to Google but the accompanying message appears to be directed at the targeted sites, many of which offer APK versions of apps. These sites may or may not offer pirated software, but the takedown notices are unusual nonetheless.

Mysterious Supreme Court Action?

The sender claims to represent unnamed game developers and, in brok...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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In June, Triller filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against the YourEXTRA YouTube channel for allegedly pirating the Jake Paul vs. Ben Askren fight. According to court documents the parties previously agreed to settle the claim and a fee was paid but Triller doubled back, returned the money, and filed a lawsuit anyway. And that's not the only settlement controversy in Triller's cases.

Earlier this year, people who allegedly offered or even watched the Jake Paul vs. Ben Askren boxing match online without permission were sucked into legal action.

Copyright owner Triller filed a wave of lawsuits after the PPV fight aired, targeting various sites and their operators. That included a number of YouTube channels including the H3 Podcast, which is currently fighting back citing fair use, a defense that Triller says isn’t available.

Despite the main event of the Jake Paul card ending in just 119 seconds, Triller’s lawsuits are aimed at recovering damages...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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Internet provider RCN has asked a New Jersey federal court to dismiss the piracy liability lawsuit several filmmakers filed a few weeks ago. According to the ISP, the movie companies are part of a well-known web of copyright trolls, which failed to plead proper copyright infringement claims.

Under US copyright law, Internet providers must terminate the accounts of repeat infringers “in appropriate circumstances.”

In the past such drastic action was rare but with the backing of legal pressure, ISPs are increasingly being held to this standard.

Initially, these lawsuits were mostly initiated by music companies, backed by the RIAA. However, in recent months a group of independent filmmakers joined in. These plaintiffs include the makers of films such as The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard, London Has Fallen, and Hellboy.

One of the targeted ISPs is ...

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Yout.com sued the RIAA in 2020 seeking a declaratory judgment that its stream-ripping service is lawful. A second amended complaint filed in September was supposed to provide more detail but according to the RIAA, Yout has failed to describe how its service operates. As such, Yout fails to state a plausible claim so the action should be dismissed with prejudice.

Yout.com’s legal battle with the RIAA, which was instigated by the YouTube-ripping service in 2020, hasn’t been a straightforward affair. The original complaint hoped to achieve a declaratory judgment that the service operates legally but the RIAA has fought back on every detail.

The basis of Yout’s complaint is that it operates an entirely legal service that, contrary to the claims of the RIAA, does not “descramble, decrypt, avoid, bypass, remove, deactivate, or impair” YouTube’s so-called ‘rolling cipher technology’ when it allows users to download MP3&#...

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Posted on TorrentFreak
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The RIAA is helping U.S. music companies to fight piracy, which isn't always an easy task. One of the major frustrations is that, due to hidden or shielded Whois information, it's often hard to identify the people who run sites and services. According to the RIAA, the governing domain name body ICANN needs to step up its game. Perhaps the EU can help as well?

Tackling online piracy is a complicated endeavor that often starts by identifying the operators of infringing sites and services. This is also where the first hurdles come into play.

Most pirate operations shroud themselves in secrecy and do all they can to remain anonymous. This starts with the domain name registration.

The owner of every domain name on the Internet is required to supply personal information when they buy a domain. This “Whois” information has to be accurate. However, it’s not necessarily available to the public at large.

Whois Privacy...

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